What Kinds of Internships to Look for in DC and How to Find Them

There is a strong appeal for students and young people to work in Washington D.C.. Where else can you immerse yourself in politics, history, journalism, and the media like our nation’s capital? As internship seekers look into the opportunities available, there are a few fields that are the most popular to consider.

  1. Government/Politics. The most obvious area where you can find internships is in the political realm. There are usually openings working for senators and congressmen as well as other government offices, many of which are located in D.C. You may find that you’ll apply for these internships in your home state and then move to D.C. for your internship.

  2. Legal Fields. With government offices, you’ll find a plethora of lawyers managing the ins and outs of our nation’s laws. Many of these law offices look for interns to manage their day-to-day operations. Law students are obviously good candidates for these internships

  3. Business. Of course, you can find opportunities in general business, and therefore internships, in any large city. But in D.C., there is a combination of private industry with government outlets located around The Hill that provide ample selection.

  4. People-oriented Fields (Hospitality/Human Resources). All of the major companies around D.C. will have human resource departments, many of them hiring interns. The hospitality industry is also hot because of the number of events that take place in the city.

  5. Journalism. Also due to the frequency of events in D.C., there are many journalists covering them. For journalism majors, it’s likely you can find an internship with a news organization, whether big or small.

  6. Media. Outside of journalism, other media outlets also hire interns. Any organization like a museum or NPR will have media departments, so that may be a good place to start.

  7. Non-profit. Philanthropy is also a focus of Washington D.C. Many politicians are involved in non-profit organizations, so if you’re interested in a specific cause or charity, this is also a place to look for an internship.

When searching for an internship, there are a few tools to use:

  1. Social Media. If you want the inside track on internships in D.C., then follow key accounts like @senateplacement on Twitter, or browse through the website http://www.house.gov/employment, and check the members’ official sites for internships. You can use social media to find out about job openings or popular sectors of government that might have a plethora of openings, but you can also use it for connecting with people and networking.

  2. LinkedIn. Speaking of networking, LinkedIn is the quintessential site for it. Start connecting with people who work in the industries that interest you and find out who is linked to where you want to be. Send messages and ask for a few minutes of their time for a question. If people are busy, you don’t want to interrupt them too much, so be aware of how much time you ask for.

  3. Tom Manatos Jobs: www.tommanatosjobs.com lists many work opportunities on The Hill.

  4. Traverse Jobs: https://www.traversejobs.com/ is also another great resource for career opportunities on The Hill.



https://joinhandshake.com/blog/students/internships-in-washington-dc/


https://internsdc.com/7-top-internship-fields-washington-dc/


https://www.thecampaignworkshop.com/how-land-your-first-dc-political-internship



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